At the Poll Tax Riot

I attended the Poll Tax Riot by accident. I was at the theatre with my family on Charing Cross Road when the lights came up at the end of the performance and the house manager told us there had been a little disturbance outside so we would have to remain in our seats for a short period. As we did so, this was taking place on the street above.

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We’d seen the coaches parked up as we drove into London, but I had little interest in politics. I knew who the Prime Minister and  leader of the opposition were, but that’s about as far as it went. I would have recognised other names – I watched and enjoyed Spitting Image – but none of it really meant very much to me. Perhaps that’s as it should be when you are 14. Questions of policy were largely irrelevant so the anger towards the Poll Tax Riot had passed me – and my Daily Mail-reading parents – almost completely by. And, boy, were people angry.

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When the house manager gave us the all clear, we climbed the stairs – the theatre  was in a little basement – and emerged on to a devastated Charing Cross Road. What I most remember is the stench from all the overturned bins, debris spilling on to the streets, and the complete absence of traffic, people and noise. It was spooky. That smell I can still recall, a horrible, fatty, sweet stink of rot and decay. London then was a dirty city, but this was something else.

My father – surely in a state of some fear – ushered us through back streets towards the car park in Soho but I remember little of this journey, which surely would have taken us past smashed shops, mobs of protesters and riot police desperately trying to get their shit together. Once we reached the car, my father visibly relaxed but one junction, he had to hit the accelerator while we waited at a red light. He later said he’d seen we were about to be sandwiched between a bunch of rioters and some police and decided this was not a time to obey the laws of the road. Once again, I’d missed this sight.

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I thought about all this again while reading a pamphlet I picked up recently for £2 in a local bookshop. Produced by ACAB Press (an acronym for All Coppers Are Bastards) and ‘dedicated to all working-class heroes’, Poll Tax Riot: 10 Hours That Shook Trafalgar Square contains 12 eyewitness accounts of the riot. The interviewees all appear to be anarchists, and are as equally contemptuous of the traditional Left – Militant are particularly despised, and there are amusingly barbed references to George Galloway and Tommy Sheridan – as they are the police. Most of them seem to have had a great old time, chucking stuff at coppers, smashing windows and setting fire to South Africa House. This is about revenge.

‘Off we go intent upon destruction, up Charing Cross Road, into the West End, everything a target, everything subject to our rage and deep down surely a demonstration of how hated this world is.’

Cars are turned on their roofs, shops looted, the Hippodrome smashed and the police attacked whenever they are seen. There are no dissenting voices to the general feeling the Met finally got what they had deserved for a decade. One protester who ended up in a cell even claims that his fellow cellmate was a prison officer who joined in the fun because he ‘fucking hates the cops’.

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The pamphlet is so gleefully celebratory of the riot that it has to distance itself from the Trafalgar Square Defendants’ Campaign, set up to help those that had been arrested, even as it promises it will give them all proceeds from its sale. It also announces that ‘this pamphlet is anti-copyright and can be freely reproduced by any revolutionary group. But copyright protects it from being used by journalists, rich bastards, etc.’ I hope they don’t sue.

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3 responses to “At the Poll Tax Riot

  1. In the book that I edited for Time Out a couple of years ago on the big changes in London of the past 40 years [it’s called London Calling, since you ask, http://shop.timeout.com/london-guides/london-calling.html%5D, Jeremy Hardy wrote a short piece about his memories of the Poll Tax riots. Here’s an extract (I hope he doesn’t mind): ‘On 31 March 1990, London had won the competition to host the end of the poll tax. Other cities had put in bids, but ours was the strongest. The final battle was not in a deprived area, but, rather magnificently, in the West End. And I missed it because I was doing topical comedy on a TV show. I marched for a bit, but when we got to Whitehall, I had to peel off to go to rehearsals in Great Windmill Street. By the time we finished the recording, London looked as though Godzilla had passed through, and Thatcher’s government was in serious trouble. And I had missed it because I was busy making humourous observations about current events.’

  2. Very oddly, I, too, was in a theatre. I was in the Palace Theatre working on Les Miserables as a stage hand.

    It was very odd to go outside and meet friends who had been on the march asking if we had any medical supplies indoors. As I often sustained a skelf injury I knew we had very little except tweezers. It was quite bizarre. Particularly since we did have barricades which theoretically could have simply been driven onto the streets. Not like the big metal things police are calling ‘cordons’ nowadays, but still!

  3. Pingback: The Diana shrine: 20 years ago | The Great Wen

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